What future for Native Oysters in Clew Bay?

Oysters have been a source of food for the people around Clew Bay shores from  prehistoric times. ‘Kitchen middens’ which are collections of discarded oysters shells can sometimes be seen exposed on eroded seashore banks and shows our ancestors taste for dining on shellfish picked at low tide. Honour Sisk’s study into the islands inContinue reading “What future for Native Oysters in Clew Bay?”

Spring bloom arrives in Clew Bay

Recently I met an oyster farmer in Murrisk who grows pacific oysters. I asked if he saw any recent growth in his oysters after a long winter. He said he noticed fresh growth after a period of rain. Oysters are “filter feeders” and filter 50 gallons (189 Litres) of  water per day and extract phytoplanktonContinue reading “Spring bloom arrives in Clew Bay”

Vikings, longships and Clew Bay

On Ireland’s west coast Viking raiders were known to raid monasteries on offshore islands (Skelligs, Inishmurray) and inland up rivers from the coast. Clew bay’s islands were a perfect seafarers haven to rest up for such raiders. The National Museum in Castlebar has a fascinating find which suggests Viking ships have visited Clew Bay inContinue reading “Vikings, longships and Clew Bay”

Clew bay, sunshine, wind, and mackerel

Sunshine, wind and mackerel on the Wild Atlantic Charters in Clew Bay, County Mayo.

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